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Only Switzerland beats Denmark in talent development

Switzerland puts Denmark to shame when it comes to developing talent. The good news is that everyone else is even worse. 
Denmark can compete internationally in areas such as apprenticeships and employee training, language skills and worker motivation.

Publiceret: 23.11.2017
Af Felix Bekkersgaard Stark mail

For the third year running, Denmark has been named the world’s second-best talent developer in the annual IMD World Talent Ranking.

We are, however, a whole ten points behind the global winner, Switzerland, which is number one in both the category “readiness” and “appeal”, while Denmark is only best in the category “investment and development”. And here, the figures are even a bit misleading.

“Danish expenditures on its educational grant and loan scheme, SU, are counted as part of Denmark’s investment in education. That isn’t accurate, and even though there has been an SU reform that has lessened Danish expenses slightly, we spend more money on SU for students in further education than we spend on the educations themselves,” says Deputy Director Charlotte Rønhof, the Confederation of Danish Industry.

See also: Copenhagen champion of family life

Failing to attract internationally

Denmark can compete internationally in areas such as apprenticeships and employee training, language skills and worker motivation. However, Denmark does not do too well at attracting qualified international labour. High taxes and high cost of living also pull Denmark down in the ranking.

“Among companies, there is much focus on attracting and retaining talent as well as ensuring that employees have the skills companies require. But it is important that we do not take our foot off the pedal and think everything is fine. We need educations of high quality, and we are looking forward to the government’s presentation of its language strategy,” says the deputy director.

According to Charlotte Rønhof, there is a need for initiatives that make it more attractive for highly qualified foreigners to settle in Denmark.

“For example, we must be better at retaining international students. One way could be to concentrate recruitment of foreigners on the professions in which we have the greatest need for labour and less on the educations where it is more difficult to find work afterwards,” says Charlotte Rønhof.

See also: Denmark could be better at attracting talent

We are looking forward to the government’s presentation of its language strategy.
DEPUTY DIRECTOR CHARLOTTE RØNHOF, DI
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PUBLISHED: 11/23/2017 LAST MODIFIED: 11/23/2017