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In 2030, immigrants will make up 20 per cent of the workforce

By 2030, every fifth person in Denmark between the ages of 20 and 69 will either be an immigrant or the child of an immigrant. It is therefore crucial that more immigrants enter the job market, says the Confederation of Danish Industry.
Highly-educated descendants of immigrants are almost just as likely to be in employment as highly-educated Danes.

Publiceret: 10.01.2018
Af Felix Bekkersgaard Stark mail

720,000 people. That is the number of immigrants and descendants between the ages of 20 and 69 who will live in Denmark in 2030, shows a new analysis that the Confederation of Danish Industry has carried out on the basis of figures from DREAM’s 2017 socioeconomic projection.

This is an increase of nearly 160,000, and given that the number of ethnic Danes in the same age group will decline by 128,000 in that period, immigrants and their descendants will make up nearly 20 per cent of the working age population in 2030, compared to 15 per cent today.

“It is absolutely crucial that we as a society make a great effort to integrate them better into the workforce. If more immigrants and descendants enter the job market, they could make a significant and necessary contribution to society,” says Deputy Director Steen Nielsen, the Confederation of Danish Industry (DI).

50,000 more people in the working age

DI’s analysis also shows that by 2030, there will be 50,000 more people between the ages 20 and 69. This is solely due to the growing number of immigrants and their descendants.

“The portion of the working age population with Danish extraction is falling considerably, partly because Danes do not have as many children. This decline is offset by an increasing number of immigrants in the working age, but it makes it all the more necessary that we are able to get them into employment. Here, education plays a key role. Highly-educated descendants of immigrants are almost just as likely to be in employment as highly-educated Danes,” says Steen Nielsen.

The portion of the working age population with Danish extraction is falling considerably, partly because Danes do not have as many children.

DEPUTY DIRECTOR STEEN NIELSEN, DI
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PUBLISHED: 1/10/2018 LAST MODIFIED: 1/10/2018