On di.dk we use cookies for multiple purposes relating to functionality, web analyze, and marketing. If you continue, you accept cookies for these purposes. You can read more about cookies and change your cookie settings on this page.

Denmark is the world’s best talent developer

Only Switzerland beats Denmark in the annual IMD World Competitiveness ranking of 61 countries which measures labour, investment and attracting and retaining talent. Denmark is ranked in first place when it comes to conditions for developing talent within the country’s borders.
The report divides results into three categories: Investment in Talent Development, Attractiveness for Talent and Skills Accessibility. According to the index, Denmark is a world leader in the first category. Photo: Colourbox

Publiceret: 01.12.2016
Af Felix Bekkersgaard Stark mail

The IMD World Competitiveness Centre has just published the results of its annual list of the competitiveness of 61 countries in terms of developing, attracting and retaining talent, the so-called IMD World Talent Report 2016.

Denmark is ranked second overall, only overtaken by Switzerland. That is the same ranking as last year while the Swedes have jumped seven places up the list to come in fourth overall.

“Again this year, Denmark is ranked an impressive second. This is because Danish businesses focus heavily on attracting and retaining talent and because employee motivation is very high. We are very pleased with this,” says Charlotte Rønhof, deputy director at the Confederation of Danish Industry.

No. 1 at talent development

The report divides results into three categories: Investment in Talent Development, Attractiveness for Talent and Skills Accessibility. According to the index, Denmark is a world leader in the first category.

Denmark’s impressive ranking is also due to the fact that the sky-high cost of state education grants is included as investment in education.  

“It all looks good on paper, but it is worth noting that we actually spend more money on state education grants for students attending universities and colleges than we spend on the courses themselves. So this is not a true picture of investment in education of high quality and relevance. You could almost say that we have won a medal by doping. The Confederation of Danish Industry therefore looks forward to the government putting forward a proposal for a state education grant reform,” says Charlotte Rønhof.

See also: IMD World Talent Report 2016

The tax burden

In the Attractiveness for Talent category, Denmark is only ranked 11 which is due to the fact that foreigners are not especially attracted by the Danish job market, that Denmark has high living costs and has the second highest personal tax burden of the 60 countries that have been assessed.

“In the competition for talent, it is vital for Danish businesses that foreign specialists have Denmark on their radar. This calls for a branding strategy for marketing Denmark as an attractive place to live and work. And for us to ease the tax burden on high incomes in particular,” says Charlotte Rønhof. 

See also: Foreign employees account for two thirds of Danish prosperity (in Danish)

 

This calls for a branding strategy for marketing Denmark as an attractive place to live and work. And for us to ease the tax burden on high incomes in particular.
CHARLOTTE RØNHOF, DEPUTY DIRECTOR AT THE CONFEDERATION OF DANISH INDUSTRY
More info
Kontakt image
Direct: +45 3377 3797
Mobile: +45 5213 2312
E-mail: mfjdi.dk
Your e-mail address will be used solely for this newsletter subscription. You can unsubscribe at any time here.
PUBLISHED: 12/1/2016 LAST MODIFIED: 12/1/2016