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Businesses: difficult to get Danes to commute very far

A new survey shows that many businesses are finding it increasingly difficult to attract employees who live more than a 30-minute commute away. 
According to a survey of the Confederation of Danish Industry’s membership, many businesses are finding it increasingly difficult to attract employees who would face a long commute.

Publiceret: 17.11.2016
Af Peter G. H. Madsen mail

Fyns Smedejerns Trapper is located in Broby, a town only 20 kilometres from the centre of Odense. Nonetheless, the company has recently found it increasingly difficult to attract new employees living in the capital of Funen.

“Nothing happens when we look for new employees. It is becoming an increasingly serious problem and means that we have to hold back on our sales,” says Managing Director Alan Holm from Fyns Smedejerns Trapper who has found it difficult to attract both boilermakers and administrative staff.

“Getting people to come out here is difficult. When jobs are available in Odense, many just stay close to where they live.”

Long commutes are a problem

Fyns Smedejerns Trapper is far from the only business finding it more difficult to attract employees who live slightly further away from their site.

In a survey of 445 of the Confederation of Danish Industry’s member companies, 27% respond that compared to five years ago they are finding it more difficult to recruit people who live more than a 30-minute commute from their premises.

6% believe that it has become easier. The rest have either responded that no change has taken place in the past five years or that they do not know.

According to Deputy Director Kent Damsgaard from the Confederation of Danish Industry, the explanation may be that the job market is more buoyant in general which is why more and more people are able to find a job closer to home.

“It is very positive that we have created more than 100,000 new jobs in recent years and that job opportunities have vastly improved. But we still have to be very aware that we should apply for jobs that best match our skills – even if it means a slightly longer commute.
By ensuring that every person in Denmark works at what they are best at, productivity rises and prosperity for the Danes and for Denmark grows. That is why it is so important that we are mobile and willing to commute – and that we have an infrastructure in place that makes this possible.”

See also: Businesses searching in vain for staff

The problem is greatest further from major cities

The Confederation of Danish Industry’s survey shows that the problems of attracting employees often become greater the further away from major urban centres you get.

“A shortage of the right employees is a growing challenge and now more than one in every three businesses says that they are experiencing difficulties recruiting. When many businesses are competing for manpower, willingness to commute very far declines and that greatly affects many businesses that are located far from major cities,” says Kent Damsgaard and adds:

“Businesses suffer because they are forced to hold back on sales and development plans. But it may also mean that generating growth and development across Denmark as a whole will become more difficult.”

According to Statistics Denmark, employed men commute an average of 23.9 kilometres a day while women commute 16.7 kilometres.

See also: Municipality business-friendliness hits record high

 

Nothing happens when we look for new employees. It is becoming an increasingly serious problem and means that we have to hold back on our sales.
MANAGING DIRECTOR ALAN HOLM, FYNS SMEDEJERNS TRAPPER
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PUBLISHED: 11/17/2016 LAST MODIFIED: 11/17/2016