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Better integration could bring 139,000 more people into the workforce

If the employment rate for first- and second-generation immigrants increases to the rate among Danish natives, it can bring 139,000 more people into the workforce by 2030, a new analysis shows.

730,000 first- and second-generation immigrants are expected to live in Denmark in 2030. Their integration into the job market will be increasingly important for the country in the coming years. Foto: Hans Søndergaard

Publiceret: 05.04.2018
Af Peter G. H. Madsen mail

The outcome will be an employment increase of historical dimensions if even more first- and second-generation immigrants are successfully integrated into the job market in coming years. This is the conclusion of a new analysis carried out by the Confederation of Danish Industry (DI).

If the country successfully increases the employment rate for first- and second-generation immigrants so that it corresponds to the rate among Danish natives, there will be 139,000 more workers on the job market in 2030. In comparison, the major reforms that contribute to increasing the retirement age will result in approximately 70,000 more workers on the job market in 2020.

“The figures show that successful integration at workplaces and in society is highly significant in relation to the opportunities to create growth and welfare in Denmark,” says Deputy Director Steen Nielsen, head of DI’s salary and labour market policy department.

“If more first- and second-generation immigrants were to have an everyday at workplaces, it would be a really good thing—for companies, for the individual and for society.

Venstre: Of course immigrants have competences


DI’s analysis also shows that first- and second-generation immigrants will make up an increasing portion of the 20-69-year-olds who make up the working age population. Whereas there are currently 564,000 first- and second-generation immigrants of working age today, in 2030, that number will be 720,000, or one fifth of the total working population.

Spokesperson for Integration Sofie Carsten Nielsen of the Danish Social Liberal Party (Radikale Venstre) is pleased that DI’s calculations highlight the potentials of better integration instead of solely focusing on the problems.

“This is exactly the right approach—particularly at a time where companies say they lack labour,” she says.

In the governing Liberal (Venstre) party, spokesperson for Integration Marcus Knuth also believes that it should be possible to get more immigrants and descendants into jobs.

“It’s unacceptable that so many remain outside the job market. We’re talking about people who have managed to flee and travel through Europe to get to Denmark. Of course they have competences,” he says and adds:

“We need to take all measures that could have an effect—ideally in close cooperation with the business community.”


We’re talking about people who have managed to flee and travel through Europe to get to Denmark. Of course they have competences
MARCUS KNUTH, SPOKESPERSON FOR INTEGRATION IN THE GOVERNING LIBERAL (VENSTRE) PARTY
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PUBLISHED: 4/5/2018 LAST MODIFIED: 4/5/2018