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Artificial intelligence can predict when you will lose customers

The newly opened Danish Centre for Applied Artificial Intelligence has algorithms that can develop new products or predict customer behaviour. The Confederation of Danish Industry hopes that the new centre can help make Denmark a frontrunner in the field.
Among the offers for companies at the new Danish Centre for Applied Artificial Intelligence is a “data check-up” and help to make a plan for utilising more data in everyday operations. Photo: DCAKI

Publiceret: 01.11.2017
Af Karen Witt Olsen mail

The Danish Centre for Applied Artificial Intelligence (DCAKI) opened its doors in Copenhagen last Friday - and will henceforth be the place to go if you need help with what many people consider a bit abstract or futuristic: artificial intelligence.

“Artificial intelligence is not invisible hocus-pocus, but a new, wonderful toolbox that allows us to do things that simply have not been practically realisable until now,” says Anders Kofod-Petersen, Head of Data Science and Engineering Lab at the Alexandra Institute.

The Alexandra Institute is a non-profit company working with research-based IT innovation and is responsible for the new centre.

The Danish Centre for Applied Artificial Intelligence promises that from now on, companies will be able to get a simple recipe for how to take the next step into the digital realm - without first reinventing the wheel.

“The algorithms in artificial intelligence can recognise patterns, predict outcomes and create whole new products and services. For example, they can predict when you will lose customers or whether an accident is about to happen because traffic is so bad,” says Anders Kofod-Petersen.

Don’t be afraid


The Confederation of Danish Industry (DI) applauds the opening of the new centre - because Denmark’s producers need to get to work with artificial intelligence.

Christian Hannibal, head of DI’s Digital Taskforce, notes that Denmark is well equipped for the fourth industrial revolution and that companies should in no way fear artificial intelligence.

“We have a high knowledge level and are far ahead digitally. That is the way forwards now, because the world is facing a revolution in the use of artificial intelligence, where companies can seriously employ the technology to do lots of things smarter,” he says.

See also: Three technologies to take seriously

Data drives operations

Head of Data Science and Engineering Lab at the Alexandra Institute, Anders Kofod-Petersen, highlights that artificial Intelligence can, among other things, also make companies more data-driven.

“It can help give companies real-time insight into customer demands, for example, so that they can come up with new products or optimise production methods,” he says.

The Danish Centre for Applied Artificial Intelligence offers to identify concrete ways in which a company can work with data.
“We look at how prepared the company is to develop its business using data. We then develop a plan and help to implement it in collaboration with our experts, just as we offer companies’ big data consultants a three-hour course with presentations and assignments,” he says.

Head of DI’s Digital Taskforce hopes that the new centre will also help put Denmark on the map as one of the leading countries within artificial intelligence.

“We hope that it can help attract the best minds and most innovative companies to Denmark,” he says.

See also: Tech startups need your brain

Danish Centre for Applied Artificial Intelligence (DCAKI)
The purpose of the centre is to make competences within artificial intelligence and machine learning easily accessible for companies, and the idea is therefore that companies can move a department or a few of their employees into the centre, where they sit with experts who can help companies get started or contribute with expertise.
The centre is located at Univate, a new co-working space at the University of Copenhagen’s South Campus.

Artificial intelligence is not invisible hocus-pocus, but a new, wonderful toolbox.
ANDERS KOFOD-PETERSEN, HEAD OF DATA SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING LAB AT THE ALEXANDRA INSTITUTE
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PUBLISHED: 11/1/2017 LAST MODIFIED: 11/6/2017